New Trends in Potency Pills

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Erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence is sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis during sexual activity. It turns out that a man often gets multiple erections throughout the night. It is estimated that over 70% of all serious impotence cases are the result of diabetes, kidney diseases, multiple sclerosis, endocrine disorders, vascular diseases, and high blood pressure, as well as neurological diseases. One of the most promising herbs is the purified extract of Tribulus terrestris. In all, these studies proved that Tribulus works very well in curing sexual dysfunctions and maximizing sexual performance when taken regularly. Additionally, adequate levels of testosterone (produced by the testes) and an intact pituitary gland are required for the development of a healthy erectile system. It is estimated that between 50% and 60% of diabetic men are impotent. There are two methods for measuring changes in penile rigidity and circumference during nocturnal erection: snap gauge and strain gauge. This form of impotence is rare and often caused by extreme psychological conditions, such as intense fear of intimacy, extreme feelings of guilt and severe anxiety. Impotence can be treated — sometimes even without drugs. During the late 16th and 17th centuries in France, male impotence was considered a crime, as well as legal grounds for a divorce. Modern drug therapy for ED made a significant advance in 1983, when British physiologist Giles Brindley dropped his trousers and demonstrated to a shocked Urodynamics Society audience his papaverine-induced erection.[30] The drug Brindley injected into his penis was a non-specific vasodilator, an alpha-blocking agent, and the mechanism of action was clearly corporal smooth muscle relaxation. Although they are often dismissed as ineffective solutions to impotence, more and more clinical research studies have found that herbs can help impotent men. Tribulus had been used as traditional medicine to treat sexual dysfunction and male infertility in Europe and Asia for many decades before improvement in scientific extraction techniques allowed identification of its active ingredient, protodioscin. Modern drug therapy for ED made a significant advance in 1983, when British physiologist Giles Brindley dropped his trousers and demonstrated to a shocked Urodynamics Society audience his papaverine-induced erection.[30] The drug Brindley injected into his penis was a non-specific vasodilator, an alpha-blocking agent, and the mechanism of action was clearly corporal smooth muscle relaxation. Additionally, adequate levels of testosterone (produced by the testes) and an intact pituitary gland are required for the development of a healthy erectile system.

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